Saturday, June 2, 2012


3 Elders were members of the Maryland Militia 37th Bn. During the Revolutionary War. All 3 are the sons of  William Elder (My GGGGGG Grandfather).

  First is Ignatius Elder  (1749-1801) and Francis Elder (1755-1809). I didn't find a lot of information on Ignatius, He died in Kentucky. I don't know yet if he were married or had any children. He was part of the Elders who had to head west to Kentucky.

Francis held the rank of Ensign in the Army.  He married  Catherine Spalding and had 13 kids! (7 lived to adulthood)

Francis was laid to rest at Saint Josephs Catholic Church Cemetery Taneytown ,Maryland.

 The 3rd brother, William Elder.

Report of the death of Pvt. Jacob Gedling 1865.

William Ahl, My 2nd Great Grand Uncle. William received a discharge from the Army in 1863 but later re-enlisted in 1865 as a 1st Lt. with A Co.Green River Infantry Battalion, Kentucky.

William fought with the 3rd Kentucky Cavalry Regiment,

After the capture of Fort Donelson the Federal troops advanced
into Tennessee and the 3d cavalry proceeded to Nashville as
part of Crittenden's division. It marched with Buell's army
to Pittsburg landing and a portion of the regiment was engaged
in the second day's battle at Shiloh and received high
commendation from Gen. Crittenden. After the battle the
regiment continued with Crittenden's division, Buell's army,
in the movements on Corinth and Iuka.

It was on constant duty all the summer in Tennessee and
Alabama, being at Huntsville Florence, Athens and other
points. From Athens, Ala., it moved to Decherd, Tenn., and
thence proceeded with Buell's army into Kentucky. On Aug. 11,
1862, Gen. Negley, then at Columbia Tenn., reported a fight
near Kinderhook, in which Maj. Megowan's battalion of the
regiment behaved most gallantly, fighting fiercely for 4
hours, and "driving the enemy in every direction."

William P Beavin, My Great Great Grandfather, A Private 3rd Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry.

 William H Burgess, My Great Grand Uncle.

Joseph (my Great Great Grandfather) and his brother Samuel Gedling.

Thirty-first Infantry. - Col., Moses B. Walker , Lieut.-
Cols., Cyrus W. Grant, Frederick W. Lister, Milton B. W. Har-
mon; Majs., Samuel L. Leffingwell, John W. Free. This regiment
was organized at Columbus, in Aug. and Sept., 1861, to serve
for three years. It left the state on Sept. 30 and on Oct. 2
reached Camp Dick Robinson, Ky., where a regular course of
drill began which rendered the regiment more efficient. It be-
came attached to Buell's army and was in the advance toward
Corinth, during which it was engaged frequently in skirmishing
with the Confederates. It participated in the siege and was
engaged at times quite warmly. In July the regiment was di-
vided into detachments, two companies being sent to Decatur and
one to Trinity. The latter detachment, consisting of 28 men,
was attacked by a force of some 200 or 300 mounted Confeder-
ates. The attack was repulsed, but one-half of the detachment
was killed or wounded. Participating in the march to Louis-
ville the regiment was under fire at the battle of Perryville,
but was not actively engaged. It was actively engaged, how-
ever, at the battle of Stone's river, where it acquitted itself
nobly. The regiment then enjoyed a few months, rest and in
June it started on the Tullahoma campaign. It was engaged at
Hoover's gap and, in connection with the 17th Ohio, carried a
position defended by two Confederate brigades. The regiment
was engaged on both days at Chickamauga and suffered severely.
Its next engagement was Brown's ferry and then followed Mis-
sionary ridge, where it was among the foremost regiments to
bear the loyal standard into the enemy's works. About this
time the regiment re-enlisted, received a furlough of 30 days,
and in the following spring it marched on the Atlanta campaign.
It was engaged in an assault on the enemy's line in front of
Resaca and lost heavily. It participated in all the important
engagements of the campaign except the battle of Jonesboro,
then moved with Sherman's army to the sea, thence up through
the Carolinas, and was mustered out on July 20, 1865.

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